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Tuesday, September 6, 2011

painting on ceramics

i found this beauty at the thrift store a while back.
although the coloring on this really isn't bad,
i wanted to have a different color than brown.
you will need rubbing alcohol
a paint brush
a lot of patience
and this paint:
americana gloss enamels by decoart

so this is very simple.

step one:
clean the ceramic with rubbing alcohol.
no need to sand or anything! 
just wet a cotton ball and wipe the surface clean!

step two:
get to work. be patient. this takes years.
(i never exaggerate.)

after one coat:

after a million coats: 
(i think i did four-but i let each dry so painted over a course of days)
i thought i had a pic, but can't find it.
you should have a thick enough paint load that no underlying ceramic paint shows at all.
it looks so pretty at this point! but you're not done yet.

step three:
let the paint dry for 48 hours.

step four: 
preheat oven to 325 degrees fahrenheit
(i accidentally did mine at 350 and it worked fine)

step five:
load in the oven and bake for 30 minutes

and you're done!
isn't that cool.


55 comments :

  1. I can't believe that's the same teapot! I have one question...after you had painted all of the coats on, did you find that you still had loads of brushstrokes on the pot? And did the "baking" seem to remove those??? AWESOME project!

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  2. the brush strokes seemed to disappear with each coat i added. i also used a sponge brush so there weren't severe brush strokes. the pot actually looked nearly the same before & after the baking...it was just more "solid" i guess :)
    thanks for the question. very useful to know!
    {love} lauryn

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    1. I work in an art gallery and every year the Heart Association has us paint water goblets (clear glass) for an fund raiser for them. I find that if a color is streaky going on the first coat..to add some WHITE enamel paint to it. It helps that first coat go on less streaky..then the following coats use the straight enamel paint. They do sell flow medium in those bottles and a little to the paint helps it glide on smoother too. It looks white but when mixed in the paint it becomes clear and does not change the original color!

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  3. this is TOO COOL lauryn!! Thanks for sharing! What are you going to do with your cute, green tea pot now? :)

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  4. Found you via the Homework link party, and I think this is pretty awesome. I was wondering, though, is the paint food safe?

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  5. kara: my green teapot is still looking for a place in my home... for now it is boringly sitting atop my fridge.

    laina: the paint is NOT for direct contact with food. i painted this with the intention for decoration only. but if you had a ceramic dish you wanted painted, you could paint the outside and leave the inside for food use.

    thanks for the questions ladies! keep them coming. i am happy to answer :)

    {love} lauryn

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  6. So adorable! Love the shocking color. Happy to see the crafty stuff :)

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  7. O.K...... I have a brown pot like this too. I actually use it though. In theory, as long as I leave the inside alone, even the spout, I should be able to still use it for tea? It would be REALLY great to change the color! Thanks for the post!

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    1. tea cosies would allow colour change on food utensils but this project is beautifully described so that all can do it. thanks for posting!

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  8. wow, this is great. thanks for the tutorial! i always need proof before i have that much patience, and you gave me that proof!

    i would love for you to come link up this or any other amazing project at my creativity party going on right now!

    letbirdzfly.blogspot.com

    thanks so much for sharing!

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  9. o i love the color!! its looks so fun:) thanks for sharing!!!

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  10. That is absolutely amazing. Gotta try it!

    One question: Do you have to do any special ventilation? It looks like the kind of paint that would be toxic to breathe while it's "curing" in the oven. That's the way it is with polymer clay, a plastic. Just wondering.

    That color green is to die for.

    I found you at Handy Man Crafty Woman.

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  11. pink overalls: i didn't do any ventilation. the smell wasn't too terrible. you could definitely smell it, but i didn't feel like it was over whelming. i really probably should have opened the window or something. but i think it was fine! thanks for visiting!
    {love} lauryn

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  12. I never thought about painting something ceramic like that. That is so cute, I love the color!

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  13. I cannot believe how simple you made that look! It makes me want to paint everything I own officially! How cool! Thanks for the great tutorial!!!
    Jaime from crafty scrappy happy

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  14. That is so cute! I love the neon green too. I would love for you to link up with us at http://www.thesasselife.com/2011/09/link-party-2.html.

    Hope to see you there!
    Kim
    www.thesasselife.com

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  15. Amazing results and the color is perfect, :) so many possibilities , thanks for sharing....xo
    Lucy

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  16. that is SO cool! I've never cooked my paintings before! :) I LOVE it!! Thanks so much for linking up to Sassy Sites for our FFA party! Have a FABulous Friday!!

    XOXO!!
    Marni

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  17. This is great. What wonderful possibilities for all those thrift store treasures.

    Ruth

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  18. I never knew you could paint ceramics! L.O.V.E.! Thanks for the tute! I am your newest follower. Have a great week!

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  19. wow! I love the color! So fun! I would love it if you would share this and/or any other projects you have been up to at Tuesday Talent Show at Chef In Training! Thanks so much and I hope to see you there!
    -Nikki
    http://chef-n-training.blogspot.com/

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  20. Great repurpose! I featured your post @ WorkShop Wednesday! Thanks for sharing!

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  21. This is a great tutorial and I love how it turned out. I stumbled this. :)

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  22. love, love, love .... question, though: we have a lot of dust here (living in the country) and i'm wondering if this can be washed to clean it up?

    thanks ... darlene

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  23. Very interesting! I've noticed that gloss acrylic has stronger adhesion than normal flat paint and I'd wondered how it does on glassware. I never thought to bake it, tho. Good tips, I'll have to try this!

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  24. GASP!!!!!! That is so adorable! I love the color. What a clever thing to do and so affordable! I am so glad I stumbled on your page. Can't wait to check out your other posts!

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  26. found this on pinterest and love it! can't wait to try something out! thanks for the tips!

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  27. Could you have primed it first? Kiltz? But I guess it isn't an enamel paint so wouldn't work?

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  28. Wow! I had no idea it was this easy to repaint ceramic! :] And I love the color you chose. :] Very well done.

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  29. I have been spray painting metal. How would spray paint as opposed to this? Found you on Pinterest.

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  30. Wow, that's great, I didn't know you could paint ceramics! Something to try...

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  31. I want to paint my flour and sugar canisters but there is a plastic lining in the inside that helps it close tightly. Do you think I should try to remove it before I try to bake it?

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  32. heather:
    do the canisters say they can be baked? if so, i am sure the plastic will be fine. i would try to remove it just to be safe though. make sure you only paint the outside.. the paint its not safe for food. thanks for the question! let me know if i can answer any others!

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  33. You won't believe this,I was at Michaels purchasing some craft paints. Saw this color and thought what could I used this paint for! You have saved the day. I happen to have a pitcher that I don't bring out because I dread the color. This is definately a must do project. Thank you the inspiration and God Bless.

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  34. Thanks for sharing, I can't wait to try this.

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  35. I think I am going to try this on an ugly vase. Thanks for the instruction.

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  36. could you use regular acrylic paint?

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  37. omg thank you !! this is going to come in handy ... like crazy handy. www.heartandthrift.co

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  38. Beautiful result! Thank you for the demo and photos. Can't wait to try this technique.

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  39. Hmmm this would be fine for a just decorative object, but baking the acrylic won't necessarily make it permanent, especially on a glossy surface. Acrylic paint basically dries as a thin layer of plastic, when you make it really thick, it can become peelable - I've done this with old acrlyic on my palette. Heat won't change the plastic other than possibly hardening it or even scorching it, what would really make a difference is roughing up the surface to improve adhesion, which may be difficult to do on a glossy ceramic. I keep seeing people using sharpies or acrylic for ceramics and baking them as if mimicking the firing process of ceramic glazes will somehow impart the permanence of a real ceramic glaze. If you just want the teapot to look good and sit on your shelf, just ignore me. But objects meant to be used would be better off using proper porcelain paint markers or paints, they are usually available in craft stores along with acrylic paint. And if you do paint your teapot with acrylic, I don't think you need to bake it unless you want to speed up the drying process. Maybe it does harden the paint which would help with peeling, but it might flake off instead.

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    Replies
    1. That's not acrylic. It says "gloss enamel" and specifies that it's for wood, glass, and ceramics.

      Unless the naming is just for marketing hype, "enamel" shouldn't be "acrylic."

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  40. This method is NOT FOOD SAFE. Do not use this for anything you intend to use with food.

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  41. Question: Did you leave the oven open during the baking? And how did you know the pot wouldn't break?

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  42. Found you on Pinterest! I like this and will be looking at your blog tomorrow when I have time!

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  43. I have had great results using spray paint on ceramic thrift store finds...platters to which I add vinyl lettering, vases and pots, bird figurines, etc. Again probably not food safe, but great for decorative items and super simple. Lowe's Valspar brand has some fun bright colors.

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  45. Thank you Lauryn for sharing this idea! There are so many great ways to bring new life to old items. I have also had great success using chalk paint and then sealing it with either a clear or aging wax. If the item is going to be handled often you might want to consider brushing on Verathane Diamond Coat Floor finish for a more durable sealer/finish.

    In either case, there is no need to bake the item. And besides dusting it off and removing any obvious dirt and grime, no actual prep work is needed. I have considered sanding and using alcohol but never seem patient enough. I get so excited about my projects that I just jump right in.
    Thanks again for sharing! Your teapot is beautiful.

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  46. This post is really incredible, one of the most helpful I have ever read, indeed. The Artist's Son Pierrot With

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  47. I attempted this using red paint on a white ceramic item. Even though I let each coat dry for a full 24 hours in between, I found that the moisture and pressure of applying a new coat am would pull up the coat below. I couldn't do more than two coats and the white under color is still quite visible. My only choice is to cure it as is to harden the paint and try adding more coats. I hope it works. Otherwise this was a waste of money.

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i love comments! thank you for taking the time to write me a message, and for making me smile. :)
{love} lauryn

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